Top 7 Plastic Surgery Myth Busters


  • Stem Cell Facelifts: The Bottom Line

Buyer beware, cautions the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS), the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). All three organizations recommend steering clear of any procedure billed as a stem cell facelift or liquid facelift, at least for now. The ASAPS and ASPS issued a joint statement urging consumers to hold off on any “stem cell” cosmetic procedures. The groups state that such technologies do hold promise, but there is not enough evidence to support their use at this time.

Fat injections do have a role in facial rejuvenation on their own or in combination with other facial procedures such as facelifts, but they are not a type of facelift.

If you are interested in facial rejuvenation, discuss your concerns with a board-certified plastic surgeon, and let the physician tell you about all your options. There are many other tried and true procedures that can correct the visible signs of aging on your face, including brow lift, lip augmentation or soft tissue filler augmentation

  • A Cosmetic surgeon is the same as a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (false)

Plastic Surgeon

A member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons indicates a surgeon who is trained  to perform cosmetic surgery in all areas and performs this in an accredited facility.

Look for the American Society of Plastic Surgeons symbol to be assured of training, code of ethics, and safe operating facility.   Hospitals have strict credentialing criteria and therefore additional assurance of a surgeons qualifications is that they are credentialed to perform these procedures in a hospital.

– Recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties

– At least 6 years of training with at least 3 years in Plastic Surgery

– Operates only in accredited surgical facilities

– Strict code of ethics

Cosmetic Surgeon

– Not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties

– Varied background allowing limited areas of approved surgical skills.

– May not operate in an accredited facility or they may not have privileges to perform the procedures in a hospital.

American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery

– Provider of classroom training, does not provide board certification

– No code of ethics

– No policy on operating in accredited surgical facility

American Board of Surgery

– Accreditation for General Surgery not Plastic or Cosmetic surgery

  • Life Style Lift is different than a mini facelift. (false)

Both procedures are mini facelifts, but the mini facelift procedure performed in our office provides unexcelled longevity while not producing significant discomfort or extended downtime.  A complete evaluation is performed by the surgeon initially to formulate the ideal procedure and achieve optimal results. Patients who opt for the Lifestyle Lift will have their initial evaluation performed by a consultant and will only meet the surgeon on the day of the surgery.

  • There is significant pain following breast augmentation and tummy tuck. (false)

With use of a new long acting local anesthetic, Exparel®, post operative discomfort is dramatically reduced.

  • Breast implants need to be changed every 10 years. (false)

Unless an implant develops a leak, it should be good for a lifetime.  Most implant manufactures offer various warranty options on the implants.

  • Following liposuction fat will increase in other areas. (false)

This does not occur. A patient can gain weight following liposuction if they do not follow a healthy lifestyle, but any weight increase is not in a specific area.

  • Facelift will only last 10 years. (false)

A facelift will make a patient look at least 10 years younger, but the patient will continue to age. Ten years later they make look like they did pre-operatively, but they are now 10 years older, so they will always look 10 years better than their actual age.